After Bicycle Accident Man Wants to Share Bicycle, Pedestrian Laws

After suffering severe injuries from a bicycle accident that occurred in August 2007, the bicyclist that was in the accident wants to share bicycle and pedestrian traffic laws to make the shared roads of Florida safe for all travelers no matter their mode of transportation. The man believes he survived his life-threatening accident in order to spread the word on traffic laws.

In August 2007, the 63-year-old park ranger was in a terrible bicycle accident that left him in the hospital for two months. The park ranger remembers beginning his day like he began so many others by riding his recumbent bicycle six miles to work. A recumbent bicycle is different than a normal two wheeled bicycle. A recumbent bicycle has three wheels and sits lower to the ground. As the park ranger began his commute back home, he was hit by a car on a recreation trail that ran alongside a local road.

The 63-year-old was taken to a hospital and remained there for the next two months. Hospital staff put the man in a drug induced coma because he had suffered a small brain hemorrhage. The park ranger also sustained a broken pelvis, a broken wrist, a broken clavicle, three broken ribs, a punctured lung, a damaged hip joint and road rash to his back. In order to walk, the 63-year-old needed the assistance of a walker for a time period and then needed the support of a cane. Now, the park ranger can walk without assistance but lives with pain from the accident.

According to the Florida Highway Patrol and their injury attorney, the man failed to yield to the car on the recreation trail. Citations were not given for the bicycle accident. The man says that even though his biking caused the accident, he believes his interest in biking gave him the strength to move beyond the accident. Now, he wants to share bicycle and pedestrian traffic laws with the public so that future accidents can be prevented. His bicycle group is helping the Florida Bicycle Association distribute a traffic law guide created by the Florida Highway Patrol.

 

 

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